ancientart
ancientart:

A Chinese topographic map (with the south positioned at the top) from Mawangdui tomb 3; dated to the early Western Han period (183–168 BC); ink on silk.

The map depicts a large territory in southern China spanning from the imperial fiefdom of Changsha (a semi-autonomous kingdom within the Han Empire, now modern-day Hunan) to the independent and sometimes hostile Kingdom of Nanyue in what is now modern-day Guangdong and northern Vietnam.

Courtesy & currently located at the Hunan Provincial Museum, Changsha, China. Via Wiki Commons.

ancientart:

A Chinese topographic map (with the south positioned at the top) from Mawangdui tomb 3; dated to the early Western Han period (183–168 BC); ink on silk.

The map depicts a large territory in southern China spanning from the imperial fiefdom of Changsha (a semi-autonomous kingdom within the Han Empire, now modern-day Hunan) to the independent and sometimes hostile Kingdom of Nanyue in what is now modern-day Guangdong and northern Vietnam.

Courtesy & currently located at the Hunan Provincial Museum, Changsha, China. Via Wiki Commons.

ancientart

ancientart:

Hadrian’s Wall. Roman emperor Hadrian (76-138 AD) had a fortified wall built across Roman Britain. The government organization English Heritage describes it as "the most important monument built by the Romans in Britain."

Restored sandstone fragments found in Jarrow (dating to 118/119) record that it was the wish of Hadrian to keep "intact the empire," which had been imposed upon him via “divine instruction.” 

The most famous and thoroughly explored frontier system created by the Roman army. Construction of the wall began in AD 122 on the instructions of the Emperor Hadrian while on a visit to the province; it was completed in about AD 133. Various kinds of construction are represented along its length, but the basic idea was a stone wall punctuated at intervals of a Roman mile by small forts with turrets in between. Larger forts lay at intervals. The purpose of the wall was to control the movement of people in and out of the empire, and to counter localized threats and uprisings. Hadrian’s Wall was abandoned between AD 140 and Ad 163 when the frontier moved north to the Antonine Wall, but otherwise it remained in place throughout the Roman occupation of Britain.

Concise Oxford Dictionary of ArchaeologyTimothy Darvill.

Photos courtesy & taken by Bill Hails.